The Frogs

  • 作   者:

    Aristophanes

  • 出版社:

    外语教学与研究出版社
    Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press

  • 语   言:

    英文

  • 支   持:

  • 电子书:

    ¥3.90

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The scene shows the house of HERACLES in the background. There enter two travellers: DIONYSUS on foot, in his customary yellow robe and buskins but also with the club and lion's skin of Heracles, and his servant XANTHIAS on a donkey, carrying the luggage on a pole over his shoulder.

XANTHIAS

Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master,

At which the audience never fail to laugh?

DIONYSUS

Aye, what you will, except "I'm getting crushed":

Fight shy of that: I'm sick of that already.

XANTHIAS

Nothing else smart?

DIONYSUS

Aye, save "my shoulder's aching."

XANTHIAS

Come now, that comical joke?

DIONYSUS

With all my heart.

Only be careful not to shift your pole,

And-

XANTHIAS

What?

DIONYSUS

And vow that you've a belly-ache.

XANTHIAS

May I not say I'm overburdened so

That if none ease me, I must ease myself?

DIONYSUS

For mercy's sake, not till I'm going to vomit.

XANTHIAS

What! must I bear these burdens, and not make

One of the jokes Ameipsias and Lycis

And Phrynichus, in every play they write,

Put in the mouths of their burden-bearers?

DIONYSUS

Don't make them; no! I tell you when I see

Their plays, and hear those jokes, I come away

More than a twelvemonth older than I went.

XANTHIAS

O thrice unlucky neck of mine, which now

Is getting crushed, yet must not crack its joke!

DIONYSUS

Now is not this fine pampered insolence

When I myself, Dionysus, son of-Pipkin,

Toil on afoot, and let this fellow ride,

Taking no trouble, and no burden bearing?

XANTHIAS

What, don't I bear?

DIONYSUS

How can you when you're riding?

XANTHIAS

Why, I bear these.

DIONYSUS

How?

XANTHIAS

Most unwillingly.

雅典即将落败,城邦深陷困顿,苟延残喘之际,《蛙》以喜剧的形式,给雅典人无限的安慰,甚至是希望。给以安慰的不紧是一时捧腹带来的忘却,这部喜剧获得这般殊荣,包涵更重的是,对于往昔辉煌无限眷恋的目光,对于当下抱有挽回与拯救的期许。

The Frogs is a comedy written by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes. It was performed at the Lenaia, one of the Festivals of Dionysus in Athens, in 405 BC, and received first place.

Aristophanes (c. 446 BC – c. 386 BC), son of Philippus, of the deme Cydathenaus, was a comic playwright of ancient Athens. Eleven of his thirty plays survive virtually complete. These, together with fragments of some of his other plays, provide the only real examples of a genre of comic drama known as Old Comedy, and they are used to define the genre Also known as the Father of Comedy and the Prince of Ancient Comedy, Aristophanes has been said to recreate the life of ancient Athens more convincingly than any other author. His powers of ridicule were feared and acknowledged by influential contemporaries; Plato singled out Aristophanes' playThe Clouds as slander that contributed to the trial and subsequent condemning to death of Socrates although other satirical playwrights had also caricatured the philosopher. His second play, The Babylonians (now lost), was denounced by the demagogue Cleon as a slander against the Athenian polis. It is possible that the case was argued in court but details of the trial are not recorded and Aristophanes caricatured Cleon mercilessly in his subsequent plays, especially The Knights, the first of many plays that he directed himself. "In my opinion," he says through the Chorus in that play, "the author-director of comedies has the hardest job of all."

DIONYSUS

The breath of flutes.

XANTHIAS

Aye, and a whiff of torches

Breathed o'er me too; a very mystic whiff.

DIONYSUS

Then crouch we down, and mark what's going on.

CHORUS (in the distance)

O lacchus! O lacchus! O Iacchus!

XANTHIAS

I have it, master: 'tis those blessed Mystics,

Of whom he told us, sporting hereabouts.

They sing the Iacchus which Diagoras made.

DIONYSUS

I think so too: we had better both keep quiet

And so find out exactly what it is.

Enter CHORUS, who had chanted the songs of the FROGS, as initiates.

CHORUS

O Iacchus! power excelling,

here in stately temples dwelling.

O Iacchus! O lacchus!

Come to tread this verdant level,

Come to dance in mystic revel,

Come whilst round thy forehead hurtles

Many a wreath of fruitful myrtles,

Come with wild and saucy paces

Mingling in our joyous dance,

Pure and holy, which embraces

all the charms of all the Graces,

When the mystic choirs advance.

XANTHIAS

Holy and sacred queen, Demeter's daughter,

O, what a jolly whiff of pork breathed o'er me!

PRAXAGORA

Friends, success has crowned our plans. But off with these cloaks and these boots quick, before any man sees you; unbuckle the Laconian straps and get rid of your staffs; (to the LEADER) and you help them with their toilet. As for myself, I am going to slip quietly into the house and replace my husband's cloak and other gear where I took them from, before he can suspect anything.

LEADER OF THE CHORUS

There! it's done according to your bidding. Now tell us how we can be of service to you, so that we may show you our obedience, for we have never seen a cleverer woman than you.

PRAXAGORA

Wait! I only wish to use the power given me in accordance with your wishes; for, in the market-place, in the midst of the shouts and danger, I appreciated your indomitable courage.

(Just as she is about to enter the house BLEPYRUS appears in the

doorway.)

BLEPYRUS

Eh, Praxagora! where are you coming from?

PRAXAGORA

How does that concern you, dear?

BLEPYRUS

Why, greatly! what a silly question!

PRAXAGORA

You don't think I have come from a lover's?

BLEPYRUS

No, perhaps not from only one.

PRAXAGORA

You can make yourself sure of that.

BLEPYRUS

And how?

PRAXAGORA

You can see whether my hair smells of perfume.

BLEPYRUS

What? cannot a woman possibly be laid without perfume, eh!

PRAXAGORA

The gods forfend, as far as I am concerned.

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